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Private Residential Tenancies Board Launch €300k Advertising Campaign on Rental Rights

Jun 25, 2015


How do we get our deposit back? Are we entitled to a longer lease? If I’m letting a flat, what if the rent’s not paid?


Private Residential Tenancies Board Launch €300k Advertising Campaign on Rental Rights

 

Tuesday 16th June 2015: The Private Residential Tenancies Board, PRTB, have today announced the launch of a €300,000 advertising campaign informing tenants and landlords of their rental rights. The campaign which will run across print, broadcast, online and outdoor media has been developed on the back of recent research* which found that one third of tenants (36%) were not fully aware of their rights as a renter and many landlords are small scale operators with 65% owning just one property and 84% having two or less.  

 

Paudie Coffey, T.D., Minister of State with special responsibility for Housing, Planning and Co-ordination of Construction 2020 welcomed the launch of the campaign, noting that “the private rented sector is an important element of the housing market, with the proportion of households in the sector almost doubling in the period 2006-2011. This campaign will be vital in raising awareness of the rights and obligations of both landlords and tenants in the sector.”

 

The Minister highlighted rising rents as an area of concern and noted that “there is currently rent regulation in place, whereby a landlord can increase rent once a year and only within the market rate.  The Government currently has the Residential Tenancies Bill before the Seanad, where improvements will be made to further secure tenants’ rights and it is expected that progress will be made on this piece of legislation in the coming weeks.”

 

The Minister praised the work of the PRTB in developing the campaign noting that “building awareness of the PRTB’s role in providing a timely and cost effective dispute resolution service is of benefit to both landlords and tenants. The promotion of a co-operative relationship between stakeholders is vital to the success of the sector.”

“Conscious of the growth and pressures on the private rental sector and the lack of awareness around rights that exists we developed this advertising campaign to focus directly on raising awareness of the rental rights of both tenants and landlord”, commented Anne Marie Caulfield, PRTB Director. “For example, many tenants do not realise that they may be entitled to continue to rent the property they are currently living in for up to four years, even if they signed a shorter lease; or they don’t always know what the correct notice periods are for the termination of their tenancy. In a market with rising rents, it is also important that both landlords and tenants know it is not permissible to charge more than the market rent, and rents can only be increased once in a 12 month period.”

 

There are currently 303,574 tenancies registered with the PRTB, with one in five, or 20% of households, now living in the private rented sector. With a very diverse client base in terms of age, background and nationality of both renters and landlords, this new campaign seeks to ask a wide range of questions around rental rights, with the answers being found at www.prtb.ie. The online ads will also be translated into Polish, Lithuanian, Cantonese, Somali, Portuguese and French.
-    My landlord wants to raise the rent twice this year. Can he do that?
-    How do we get our deposit back?
-    If I disagree with my tenants, who can mediate between us?
-    If I’m renting for 6 months, how much longer can I stay?
-    If I’m letting a flat, what if the rent’s not paid?
-    Can we find out our rental rights without paying legal fees?
-    Are we entitled to a longer lease?

The PRTB website, www.prtb.ie, has extensive information for both tenants and landlords explaining what their rights and obligations are.  “I would encourage anyone who is currently renting, or considering renting, to log on to our website and familiarise themselves with their rights and their responsibilities.  They can also download a copy of the “Good Tenant, Good Landlord” leaflet which contains all the information in one handy place and has been translated into Chinese, Slovakian, French, Lithuanian, Irish, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Russian and Latvian”, Ms. Caulfield added.

 

The first phase of the advertising campaign commences this week, with the second phase running in August to coincide with the CAO results, aiming to assist young students leaving home for the first time. The campaign has been developed by Javelin, who were appointed after a public tender competition.

Ends

 

 About the PRTB and the Private Rented Residential Market

 

The Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB) was established in 2004 to operate a national tenancy registration system and to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants. It also provides policy advice to the Government on the private rented sector, and its dispute resolution service replaces the courts in relation to the majority of landlord and tenant disputes.   According to the 2011 Census, nearly 1 in 5 households in the country are renting their accommodation in the private sector.   
* The PRTB commissioned RED C to carry out a nationwide survey of Landlords, Tenants and Estate Agents. The survey results were published in October 2014.                      

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LATEST DATA FROM PRTB QUARTERLY RENT INDEX

Jun 18, 2015
PRIVATE SECTOR RENTS IN IRELAND ROSE 6.9% FROM Q1 2014 TO Q1 2015
RENT FOR HOUSES UP 6.5% & APARTMENT RENTS UP 7.8%
APARTMENT RENTS IN DUBLIN UP 10.8% IN THE YEAR


Rents for private sector accommodation across the country rose by 6.9% in the year between the first quarter (Q1) of last year and Q1 of this year. Rents for houses were 6.5% higher, while apartment rents were 7.8% higher. Annual growth in the Dublin market was stronger, up by 9.6%, with house rents in the capital up 9% in the year, and apartment rents up 10.8%. Annual growth in rents for the market outside Dublin remained more subdued, recording growth of 5.3% compared to Q1, 2014. Again the performance differed by property type. House rents outside Dublin increased by 5.7%, while apartments increased by 5.2%.

 This data comes from the latest PRTB Quarterly Rent Index which is compiled by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) for the Board. It is the most accurate and authoritative rent report of its kind on the private accommodation sector in Ireland. This is because it is based on the actual rents being paid, according to the PRTB’s records, as distinct from the asking or advertised rent.

 In monetary terms, the rent for private sector accommodation across the whole country in Q1, 2015, was €835 – up from €781 in Q1 2014. The rent for apartments nationally was €878 (€815 a year earlier) and for a house it was €814 (€765 a year earlier). In Dublin, the rent in Q1, 2015, was €1,325 for a house and €1,205 for an apartment. A year earlier, Q1, 2014, the rent for a house was €1,215, and for an apartment it was €1,087. This represents a monthly increase in Dublin rent of €110 for a house or €118 for an apartment over the course of the 12 month period.

 Outside Dublin, the rent in Q1, 2015, was €647, with houses averaging €665 and apartments, €627. A year earlier, these figures stood at €614, €629 and €596 respectively. This represents a monthly increase in rent outside of Dublin of €36 for a house and €31 for an apartment in the 12 month period.

 Comparing quarter with quarter, the rate of increase in monthly rents nationally in Q1 this year was 1.2% compared to Q4, 2014. Looking at trends in more detail, national monthly rents for houses rose by 2% in Q1 this year compared to Q4, 2014. In contrast, rents for apartments grew by 1.3% when compared with Q4, 2014.  

An interesting feature of the latest findings is that they suggest the driver of growth changed in Q1, 2015, with rents outside Dublin showing a stronger rate of increase than Dublin rents.

 For properties outside Dublin rents, rents in Q1, 2015, were 1.5% higher than in Q4, 2014. The growth in rents outside Dublin primarily reflects the apartment market, up by 2.1% on a quarterly basis, while rents for houses outside Dublin were up 1.6% when compared to Q4, 2014. Rents in Dublin were 0.6% higher when compared with Q4, 2014. Rents for houses in Dublin grew by 2.7% compared to Q4, 2014, while apartment rents were 0.8% higher in Q1, 2015.

 Private accommodation rents across the whole country in Q1 of this year were 16.9% lower than their peak, which occurred in the final quarter of 2007.  The Rent Index shows that, nationally, rents peaked in the fourth quarter of 2007 before declining by 25% to their trough in the first quarter of 2012.

 While the peak-to-trough in the Dublin market was similar to that experienced nationally, the strength of the recovery in Dublin means that rents now are just 7.5% lower than their highest point. In contrast, the market outside Dublin has experienced more subdued growth, and rental levels remain nearly 22% off their peak levels.

 Earlier this week, the PRTB launched a nationwide advertising campaign to raise awareness among both tenants and landlords of their rental rights. Referring to one of the campaign topics, the Director of the board, Ms. Anne Marie Caulfield said that “in a market with rising rents, it is important that both landlords and tenants know it is not permissible to charge more than the market rent, and that rents can only be increased once in a 12 month period”.

 The PRTB website www.prtb.ie (click on “rent index”) also contains an Average Rent Dataset which enables people to check the average rent being paid for five different categories of dwelling types throughout the country, in both urban and rural areas. This means people can check what is the actual rent being paid for, say, a semi-detached house or a two-bed apartment in their neighbourhood, or in other parts of the country.

Ms. Caulfield also said she would “encourage anyone who is currently renting, or considering renting, to log on to the PRTB website and familiarise themselves with their overall rights and responsibilities.  They can also download a copy of the ‘Good Tenant, Good Landlord’ leaflet which covers these issues in great detail”.

 All landlords are legally obliged to register tenancies with the PRTB and the number of new registrations with the PRTB in Q1, 2015, was 23,960. The overall number of tenancies registered with the PRTB as at the end of Q1, 2015, was 308,096.

 The PRTB Index is of assistance for a range of Government purposes, including housing policy generally, and informing the Department of Social Protection’s Rent Supplement scheme. It is also an important reference document in landlord/tenant disputes on rent.  It was developed in consultation and co-operation with landlord representative groups such as the Irish Property Owners Association, irishlandlord.com, the Institute of Professional Auctioneers and Valuers, the Society of Chartered Surveyors of Ireland, and tenant representative groups such as Threshold and USI (Union of Students in Ireland).



  About the PRTB and the Private Rented Residential Market
The Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB) was established in 2004 to operate a national tenancy registration system and to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants. It also provides policy advice to the Government on the private rented sector, and its dispute resolution service replaces the courts in relation to the majority of landlord and tenant disputes.   According to the 2011 Census, nearly 1 in 5 households in the country are renting their accommodation in the private sector.   

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